Good Signage

Friday, June 3, 2016 | access g&b

Signs should be easy to see, easy to read, concise, consistent across a site or organisation, and only used when necessary.
Often signs are either too small and difficult to see, or there are so many, you can’t find the one you want.

Signs are easiest to read if they are in a sans-serif font, use capitals as they would be used in a written document, and have lettering that is well contrasted with the sign colour, and sign colours that are well contrasted with the surface (such as brick) they are placed upon.

It is really helpful to use a relevant pictogram next to the written element of the sign also.

Many signpost systems used by city and town planners do not put enough importance upon accessibility of the signage.

The signpost above, is fairly typical of many town centre signage systems, and is difficult to see, and difficult to read with small typeface that isn’t very clear, and no pictograms.

The sign on the right showing yellow stairs and an arrow is a step in the right direction – it is from Staffordshire Hospital who have made some headway in improving signage around a huge building.

The sign is at the side a doorway indicating that stairs are beyond the door and they go up to the next flolt – tha arrow though is not big enough to see from any distance, and the pictogram may be a bit difficult for some people to understand without the word “stairs” next to it. It is much better than not having a sign, or only having a one word sign though.

The sign also embossed.

Lighting is also very important with signage: avoid areas that can’t be spotlit, and avoid signs with shiny surfaces that reflect light.

Have a look around, and tell us what you think

One Voice is run by and for disabled people, and has lots of information for disabled people, friends, family, carers, collegues, and anyone else who want to know about issues affecting disabled people’s lives.

Have a look around, and tell us what you think

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