In response to a question about how the professional script reading came about:

A few months ago a disability script writing course was mentioned in a Malting’s members committee meeting.  This excited me so much that I felt almost compelled to say a few words urging members to have a go at writing and that writing can be a great way to channel talents and emotions.
After the meeting I eagerly learned more about the course and that Dr Paul Darke of the Outside centre could provide bursaries for disabled people living in Wolverhampton.
An organisation SCRIPT (www.scriptonline.net) actually run the  Poised for Flight course and it would be taught at the Birmingham Repertory theatre.  The Birmingham Rep, Birmingham – our nation’s second city.     A theatre I had heard of and imagined to be an auspicious, select  and generally trendy place to be.   A place where people would probably be impressed to know  you’d visited.
Going to such a place in our nation’s second city was daunting, the course was daunting, would I have even the remotest chance of success?  Was I just being foolish even contemplating such a course.  I hadn’t heard of SCRIPT and had no idea that any organisation existed for dramatic writers of the West Midlands.  Emails were exchanged with SCRIPT Programmes Director Catherine Edwards.   I was impressed with the efficiency and applied online via email. Even more delighted when Catherine told me there were still a couple of places remaining on the course and so I swiftly filled in the form and emailed it  Anyway,  I sent a few emails and I was awarded a bursary to do the course..  It had been years since I’d wrote anything substantial or serious.  Rust had accumulated on my writing cells, my proverbial ink pen had dried up
The course began on the first Saturday of March at 10am, rather early especially for those like me who’d have to travel from Wolverhampton via the Midland Metro. I’d have to be pushed to the Metro stop and escorted to the Rep.  I went to bed early on the night before day 1.  Unsure of the way at SnIn response to a question about how the professional script reading came about:

A few months ago a disability script writing course was mentioned in a Malting’s member’s committee meeting. This excited me so much that I felt almost compelled to say a few words urging member’s to have a go at writing and that writing can be a great way to channel talents and emotions.
After the meeting I eagerly learnt more about the course and that Dr Paul Darke of the Outside centre could provide bursaries for disabled people living in Wolverhampton.
An organisation SCRIPT (www.scriptonline.net) actually run the Poised for Flight course and it would be taught at the Birmingham Repertory theatre. The Birmingham Rep, Birmingham – our nation’s second city. A theatre I had heard of and imagined to be an auspicious, select and generally trendy place to be. A place where people would probably be impressed to know you’d visited.
The prospect of going to such a place in our nation’s second city daunting and excited me. The course was indeed daunting, would I have even the remotest chance of success? Was I just being foolish even contemplating such a course. I hadn’t heard of SCRIPT and had no idea that any organisation existed for dramatic writers of the West Midlands. I soon exchanged a couple of emails with SCRIPT Programmes Director Catherine Edwards. I was impressed with the efficiency and applied online via email. Even more delighted when Catherine told me there were still a couple of places remaining on the course and so I swiftly filled in the form and emailed it. Anyway, I sent a few emails and was awarded a bursary to do the course.. It had been years since I’d wrote anything substantial or serious. Rust had accumulated on my writing cells, my proverbial ink pen had dried up

The course began on the first Saturday of March at 10am, rather early especially for those like me who’d have to travel from Wolverhampton via the Midland Metro. I’d have to be pushed to the Metro stop and escorted to the Rep. I went to bed early on the night before day 1. Unsure of the way at Snowhill we turned right at first, wrong way despite a map. Tall, posh, swanky, mirrored skyscrapers all around. It felt as if the Metro had traversed into some esoteric time warp. Culture shock. We asked a passer by and quickly found our way, navigated past the library and through a shopping complex, passed The Copthorne, traversed the road bridge. Yes The Birmingham Rep in sight and only 9.45am
We were greeted by Tracy a tutor and we waited with other disabled people all eager to commence. Soon after this I met Catherine and another tutor called Michael. The course was taught in the Centenary Suite, a large room behind a heavy, huge, thick soundproof wooden door. Numerous tables covered by a rich velvety textured black table cloth seemed to see the scene for commencement. Tea, coffee and a plentiful amount of biscuits of various types were readily available to munch on. The course had begun, introductions were made by all. I knew from the first hour that producing a good enough script to be selected would not be an easy task.

My wings were wet like a newly born hatchling in some high tree nest. Would I learn to fly? I would soon learn the true meaning and appreciation for the term Poised for Flight.

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